Healthcare for Healthy Longevity Society

Innovation for Healthy Longevity society

We would like to support the development of “healthy longevity society”, where people are not just living long but living lively in good physical and mental health.

For the achievement of this goal, we aim to bring innovation to society by delivering valuable information on health, developing a platform for health programs, and providing technology for innovative healthcare products.

Japan is the most rapidly super-ageing society in the world

Japan is turning into a super-aging society on a scale previously unseen in the world.
According to National Institute of Population and Society Security Research, it is expected that the Japanese population will decrease to 124.1m in 2020, 116.2m in 2030 and will fall below 100m in 2050, then 90m in 2060.

Furthermore, the latest report shows that population aging rate (ratio of people aged 65 and over to the total population) in Japan is as high as 26%, which is projected to increase to more than 30% by 2025, especially due to the aging of Baby Boomers. In the foreseeable future, the elderly will account for one third of the total population in Japan.

Cabinet Office  Annual Report on the Aging Society (2015) Chart: Cabinet Office Annual Report on the Aging Society (2015)
*Refer from the reports of CAO and translated by GaiaSystemSolutions, Inc.

Population aging as well as population growth is a global issue

Population aging as well as population growth is a global issue. Other developed countries and emerging countries are expected to follow the same path as Japan, which is likely to be the first super-aging society.

The population aging rate in Japan had been the lowest among developed countries until 1980's. However, it started overtaking others in 1990's, and marked the highest in the world in 2005.
Looking at the time range, that aging rate grows from 7 to 14%, Japan has been fastest at 24 years (reached 14% at 1994, from 7% in 1970), while it took 115 years in France, 47 years in UK and 40 years in Germany.
Though Japan has been breaking the records in the manner previously unseen, Asian countries are anticipated to move faster as ever, especially in South Korea the rate will increase 33.6% in 2060 from 9.3% in 2005.

Changes in the aging rate Source : Prepared by MIC based on data culled from “World Population Prospects: The 2012 Revision” by the United Nations.
Note that data for Japan up to 2012 is based on the “2010 National Census” by MIC.

Challenges in a super-aging society

Decline in working-age population in a super-aging society would lower the nation’s potential growth rate and have a significant impact on the sustainable economic growth. As a result, national medical expenses and the one for the elderly in Japan are estimated to increase from 34.8 trillion yen and 11.4 trillion yen in 2008 to 52.3 trillion yen and 24.1 trillion yen in 2025 , respectively.

In the coming super-aging society, we need to move beyond stereotypical concepts about the elderly and keep in mind that there will be a number of “active seniors” who have plenty of knowledge and skills. To solve the issues brought by population aging, it is important to work on extending “healthy life expectancy” so that many elderly people can live independently as long as possible and actively engage with society making use of their knowledge and experiences.

The ratio of GDP to the national health expenditures Sources:Figures until 2009 - Data from Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare "Annual Health, Labor and Welfare Report 2010-2011".
Figures after 2015 - Data from Health Insurance Bureau, Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare “Medical Care Expenditures in the Future and Fiscal Burden Estimations Report”, as of Oct. 25, 2010.
Data from Origin:
Ministry of Internal Affairs "Official Announcement of Report from ICT Super-aging Society Design Council - Attainment of Smart Platinum Society", 2013.
Health Insurance Bureau, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare “Medical Care Expenditures in the Future and Fiscal Burden Estimations Report”,2010.
*Refer from the reports of MIC and translated by GaiaSystemSolutions, Inc.
Healthy Life Expectancy and Life Expectancy Disparities Sources: Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, Reference Materials for Health Japan 21 (the second term),
1) Extension of healthy life expectancy and reduction of health disparities
*Refer from the reports of MHLW and translated by GaiaSystemSolutions, Inc.